Archive for: June, 2006

The Washington Post Examines House Churches

Going to Church by Staying at Home

Clergy-Less Living Room Services Seen as a Growing Trend

By Michael Alison Chandler and Arianne Aryanpur

Sunday, June 4, 2006

After Sunday dinner at Joe Rodgers’s Rockville home, guests adjourn to the living room for church.

In his makeshift chapel, wooden kitchen stools and a floral print couch act as pews, a portable keyboard substitutes for an organ and the host, an electronics technician by day, serves as pastor.

But just as there is no formal name or dress code for this church, there is no sermon or pastor-led prayer. When it came time to bow their heads on a recent May evening, each of the 10 adults in attendance had something to contribute: One man prayed for success with his new fitness program; another sought guidance as he prepared for his upcoming marriage.

The worshipers have different faith backgrounds, including evangelical, Episcopalian and Catholic. What they share is a dissatisfaction with traditional church services.

“You can’t ask questions in most churches. You might make an appointment with the pastor, get in his daybook for a quick lunch,” said Rodgers, 50.

A growing number of Christians across Washington and around the country are moving to home churches — both as a way to create personal connections in the age of the megachurch and as a return to the blueprint of the Christian church spelled out in the New Testament, which describes Jesus and the apostles teaching small groups in people’s homes.

Estimates vary widely for a movement that is by design informal and decentralized, but the consensus among home-churchers is that they are part of a growing trend.

George Barna, a religion pollster, estimates that since 2000, more than 20 million Americans have begun exploring alternative forms of worship, including home churches, workplace ministries and online faith communities. Barna based that figure on surveys of the religious practices and attitudes of American adults that he has conducted over the past 25 years.

washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/06/03/AR2006060300225.html

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“The Latin Mass”

Strange words for a bumper sticker, no? In the course of my employment, I noticed an RV with these strange words on it, yesterday near Knoxville, TN.

I later Googled the phrase and, sure enough, there are indeed bumper stickers like this being bought and sold. Looks to be a Roman Catholic enterprise.

“Do they speak in Latin to one other,” I asked myself. I also wondered if they would prefer their sermons in Latin, too…

The following text came to mind though it applies to another matter – namely, to tongues: 1 Corinthians 14:2 For he that speaketh in an unknown tongue speaketh not unto men, but unto God: for no man understandeth him.

Thank God for those who long ago helped to end the practice of scripture readings and “masses” in Latin. The price they paid was quite high.

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